Double Ball Roulette – The Casino Table Game With Two Balls Spinning on the Same Wheel? That’s Right

So what is Double Ball Roulette? It’s one wheel that has two balls instead of just one rotating around the inner rim. Perhaps you’re wondering how two balls can revolve around one track without hitting each other and bounce off the table. Compressed air is used to simultaneously shoot both balls from a tube so the second ball always trails the first one, eliminating any chance of a collision. To make it more exciting, a remote control button is rotated among players to trigger the air gun and get the balls rolling.

The betting layout for Double Ball is the same as traditional Double Zero Roulette, however the payouts differ in that the player has two chances to win instead of just one.

For the outside wagers, (red, black, odd, even, etc.) both balls would have to land on the player(s) selected betting spots. For example, a bet on black would require both balls to land on black numbers in order to win. Winning payouts for the outside wagers have been increased to 3/1 instead of even money at 1/1 as in traditional roulette.

For the inside wagers, (a bet on the numbers only) either ball can win but the payouts are less than the traditional game because the player now has two chances to win per spin instead of just one. For example, a straight up bet on a single number would return 17/1 instead of 35/1. If both balls land in the same winning pocket, the bet would return 35/1.

If you never played Roulette before, I’ll detail the wagering options, winning payout amounts, and the differences between traditional and Double Ball.

Traditional Roulette: Inside

A bet on the numbers from 0,00, to 36 (38 numbers total)

  • One number (straight up) pays 35/1
  • Two numbers (split) 17/1
  • Three numbers (street) 11/1
  • Four numbers (corner) 8/1
  • Five numbers (basket) 6/1
  • Six numbers (line) 5/1

Double Ball Roulette: Inside

  • One number (straight up) pays 17/1 if either ball lands on the selected number, 35/1 if both balls do
  • Two numbers (split) 8/1 or 16/1
  • Three numbers (street) 5/1 or 10/1
  • Four numbers (corner) 7/2 or 7/1
  • Five numbers (basket) 5/2 or 5/1
  • Six numbers (line) 2/1 or 4/1

Traditional Roulette: Outside

A bet on the area outside of the numbers (twelve wagering options)

  • Red, black, odd, even, pays 1/1
  • First eighteen, second eighteen, 1/1
  • First twelve, second twelve, or third twelve, 2/1
  • First, second, or third column, 2/1

Double Ball Roulette: Outside

  • Red, Black, odd, even, pays 3/1
  • One red, one black, 1/1
  • First eighteen, second eighteen, 3/1
  • First twelve, second twelve, third twelve, 8/1
  • First, second, third column, 8/1

Remember, both balls must land in your bet selections in order for you to win your wager(s).

There is also a side bet called Double Ball Jackpot. If you think both balls will land on a certain number, make the side bet and collect 1300/1 if Lady luck is with you.

Good Luck!

Craps, a Table Game That’s So Mis-Understood Is Easy to Learn and Play – Here’s How

Many players avoid the casino game of craps at first because the large oval shaped table with numerous betting options seems a bit intimidating to table game players. Craps is actually easy to learn and fun to play, and here’s how:

Start at a five dollar minimum table. You’ll usually find them during non-peak hours. I recommend a buy-in at least 20X the table minimum. A button on the table will read ON or OFF. When it is in the OFF position, place your money on the table and ask the dealer for $5 chips. You will see seasoned players making various wagers. The most popular is the PASS LINE bet. Place a chip(s) in that area in front of you. When you hear the dealer shout “COMMIN’ OUT” that’s when the excitement starts and the designated SHOOTER will toss two dice. Here are the wagering choices:

Pass Line

If the shooter rolls a 7 or 11 on the first roll, you win even money. If a 2, 3, or 12 appear, you lose. Any other number, 4, 5, 6, 8, 9, or 10 becomes your POINT. A dealer will mark the point number with the ON button indicating game in progress. In order for you to win, the shooter must roll the point number before he or she rolls a 7. If a 7 appears before the point, the house wins. No other numbers matter on this wager, no matter how long it takes. The game will end only if a point or 7 is rolled.

Odds Bet

This is a wager every pass line bettor should take advantage of because it pays off in TRUE ODDS and has no house edge. If a point number is rolled, you will have the opportunity to take odds on that bet by placing an additional wager behind your pass line bet. Most casinos allow a double odds bet. For example, let’s say 4 is the point. There are three ways to win with the 4: 3 and 1, 2 and 2, or 1 and 3. However there are six ways to lose with a 7: 4 and 3, 5 and 2, 6 and 1, 3 and 4, 2 and 5, 1 and 6.Thus, 6/3 is a two to one payout. Your $10 double odds wager will earn you $20 plus your pass line bet if you win.

Don’t Pass

A very small percentage of players use this option. It works the exact opposite of the pass line. Here you are betting that the shooter will lose the roll. A wager on the don’t pass line will win if the come out shooter rolls a 2 or 3, push (no win/no loss) with a 12, lose if a 7 or 11 is rolled. Odds bets are available however your chances of winning are greater than losing, so you have to lay the odds instead of taking them. If a point is rolled such as 4, you win if a 7 is rolled first. This time 3/6 is a one to two payout so you would have to put up $20 to win $10 plus the don’t pass wager.

Be forewarned that only about 2% of players play the don’t pass, AKA wrong bettor. You will not have many friends at the table when betting wrong.

Come Bets

Come bets work the same way as a pass line bet but can only be made after a point is established. A 7 or 11 wins, a 2, 3, or 12 loses. Any other number becomes your come point and must be rolled before a 7 for you to win. You can also take true odds on your come point after the dealer moves your chip(s) to the appropriate number box. This wager is independent of the pass line wager and your come point may be other than your pass line point. Thus, if the shooter makes his or her pass line point, the game ends but your come point wagers remain active. If a 7 is rolled during the next come out roll, you lose the come bet but your odds are returned to you.

Don’t Come Bets

This play works the same way as a don’t pass wager after a point is established. You may also lay true odds. You want the 7 to be rolled before the don’t come point. Here is the one big exception on a don’t come bet: should the shooter win his or her pass line wager, and the don’t come point is made on the next come out roll, You not only lose your wager but your odds bet as well.

Place Bets

A wager on one or more point numbers (4, 5, 6, 8, 9, and 10). The bet(s) win if the number repeats before a 7 is rolled and lose if a 7 appears first. Payoffs are: 6, 8- pays 7/6, 5, 9- pays 7/5, 4, and 10- pay 9/5.

Buy and Lay Bets

A buy bet is the same as a place bet except you pay a five percent commission to the house when you make the bet but you are paid in true odds if you win. Payoffs are: 6, 8 pays 6/5, 5, 9 pays 3/2, 4, and 10 pay 2/1. A lay bet is the exact opposite of the buy bet. You must bet more to win less because your chances of winning are greater than losing.

Good Luck!

Let It Ride – A Poker Table Game Where You Can Take Your Bet(s) Back If You Don’t Like the Cards

Let it Ride is a popular poker variant table game that’s been around for more than 20 years. The game is still available at most major casinos.

What’s unique about it is that players are allowed to take back 2 of the 3 required bets if the dealt cards aren’t favorable to the player.

How to Play Let it Ride

There are six or seven seating areas. Each betting zone has three circles where three bets of equal amounts must be placed. Also included are additional betting areas where two optional bonus bets can be positioned. Note that a five-dollar minimum table would actually require a total wager of fifteen dollars per hand plus the bonus bets. The dealer will then pitch three cards, face down, to each player and also place two community cards face down in the center of the table.

To complete the five-card poker hand, players use the community cards. The objective of the game is to acquire a good poker hand by combining your three cards with the two community cards. The dealer does not play.

The player first reviews his or her three cards and must decide either to let the bets ride or ask for one back. A decision to let it ride will require the player to place the three cards face down under the first betting circle. When retrieving a bet, the player must gently scrape the cards on the felt inboard. The dealer will return one unit to the player.

The dealer then turns over the first community card. Players again have the option of taking back the second bet or letting it ride. After that round is completed the dealer reveals the last community card. All players must let the third wager ride.

All winning five card hands require at least a pair of ten’s or better. Payment is made according to a predetermined pay table. Winning amounts paid vary between casinos depending on jurisdiction.

Common Pay Table

Pair of 10’s or Better – 1 to 1

Two Pair – 2 to 1

Three of a Kind – 3 to 1

Straight – 5 to 1

Flush – 8 to 1

Full House – 11 to 1

Four of a Kind – 50 to 1

Straight Flush – 200 to 1

Royal Flush – 1,000 to 1

The house edge is about 3.5%.

Optional Bonus Bets

For $1 you can wager that the outcome of the final five card hand will range from three of a kind which pays $5 up to the Royal Flush that nets $25,000. This sounds inviting but gaming experts put the house edge for the following pay table over 13%:

Three of a Kind – $5.00

Straight – $25.00

Flush – $50.00

Full House – $200.00

Four of a Kind – $400.00

Straight Flush – $2,500.00

Royal Flush – $25,000.00

The 3 Card Bonus option is based on the value of a player’s initial three cards. The maximum amount players are allowed to wager varies between casinos. Here are the payouts:

Any Pair – 1 to 1

Flush – 3 to 1

Straight – 6 to 1

3 of a Kind – 30 – 1

Straight Flush – 40 to 1

Mini Royal (Suited Q, K, A) – 50 to 1

Some jurisdictions do not offer the Mini Royal.

The house edge is about 6% for this bet. Although this option can be tempting keep in mind that the chances of being dealt at least a pair on your first three cards are about one in four.

Correct Strategy for the First Bet

  • If you have any winning hand with a pair of 10’s or higher in your three cards, you should let it ride.
  • If you have three cards to a straight flush and one is a 10 or higher, let it ride.
  • Otherwise, pull back your bet.

Correct Strategy for the Second Bet

  • If you have any kind of winning hand with a pair of 10’s or higher, let it ride.
  • If you have four cards to a straight flush, let it ride.
  • If you have four cards to a flush, let it ride.
  • If you have four cards to an outside straight, and at least one of those cards is a 10 or higher, let it ride.
  • Otherwise, pull back your bet.

Good Luck with the game!